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MLA Citation Style, 8th Edition

This guide will provide rules and examples for using MLA citation style.

Two Authors

When a work has two authors, include them in the order they appear on the work, and invert the first author's name but write out the second author's name normally.

Works Cited Format (2 authors, scholarly journal):

First Author's Last Name, First Name, and Second Author's First Name Last Name. "Capitalized Title of Article." Capitalized and Italicized Journal Title, vol. #, no. #, year, page numbers. Capitalized, Italicized Name of Database if Applicable, URL without http:// OR DOI.

Example:

Chang, Anna C. S., and Willy A. Renandya. “The Effect of Narrow Reading on L2 Learners’ Perceptions.” RELC Journal: A Journal of Language Teaching and Research, vol. 51, no. 2, Aug. 2020, pp. 244–258. Academic Search Complete, http://dx.doi.org.ezproxy.lib.uwf.edu/10.1177/0033688219839446.

In-Text Citation Examples:

Author within the text, direct quote:

Chang and Renandya found that "text interest seems to be the single most important factor determining whether students will read" (255).

Authors not in the text, direct quote:

Reading development is directly tied to wide reading, as "text interest seems to be the single most important factor determining whether students will read" (Chang and Renandya 255).

 

Three or More Authors

Invert the first author's name add a comma and "et al."

Works Cited Format (3 or more authors, scholarly journal):

First Author's Last Name, First Name, et. al. "Capitalized Title of Article." Capitalized and Italicized Journal Title, vol. #, no. #, year, page numbers. Capitalized, Italicized Name of Database if Applicable, URL without http:// OR DOI.

Example:

Sinykin, Daniel, et al. “Economics, Race, and the Postwar US Novel: A Quantitative Literary History.” American Literary History, vol. 31, no. 4, Winter 2019, pp. 775–804. Academic Search Complete, doi:10.1093/alh/ajz042.

In-text Citation Examples:

Authors within the text, direct quote:

Sinykin et al. found that there were gender differences in the use of "slavery-inflected economic language" in the 1990s (799).

Authors not in the text, direct quote:

Curiously, we see that ". . . men begin to use slavery-inflected economic language" far more than women (Sinykin et al. 799).