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Maritime Studies: Primary Sources

What are Primary Sources?

Primary sources are materials created at the time of the topic you are researching, or by an eyewitness to the topic.  Primary sources enable the researcher to get as close as possible to what actually happened during an historical event or time period.  They are not commentary about your topic, but are the topic you are commenting about. 

Watch this brief video for help differentiating between primary and secondary sources:

Atlases

An Atlas of Maritime Florida. 1997. (Ref. Atlas G 1316 P5 A8 1997) & FWB

Atlas of Maritime History. 1975. (Ref. Atlas G 1060 L65 1975)

The Atlas of Shipwrecks and Treasure. 1994. (Ref.Atlas G 1046 P57 P5 1994)

The Times Atlas and Encyclopaedia of the Sea. 1990. (Ref. Atlas G 2800 T5 1990)) & FWB See also Atlas of the Sea (Ref. Atlas GC 21 B35), Atlas of the South Pacific (Ref. Oversize Atlas G 2860 N49), Atlas of the Oceans (Ref. Oversize Atlas G 2801 C7 A813), Indian Ocean Atlas (Ref. Atlas G 2850 U5 1976),The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (Ref. V 23 O96), Rand McNally Atlas of the Oceans (Ref. Atlas G 2800 R3 1977), and UN Atlas of the Oceans

Congressional Papers

Databases:  (Note: you must be in the library to access these electronic resources)

Microfilm & Internet Sites:

Books, Imprints, & Periodicals