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Health Care Administration: Open Education Resources for HCA

What are Open Education Resources?

Open Education Resources are defined as free materials used for teaching and learning. In higher education, these include courseware, textbooks, digital sources, open access journals, and government documents.

Why OER?

The open resource movement has been around for a while, starting with static learning objects (about 2000), and transitioning to OER that allowed for revision and reuse. It is the ever increasing cost of textbooks and materials for students that is now pushing the OER movement forward.  Textbooks and learning materials cost students approximately $1,200 per year.  According to the Chronicle of Higher Education, 7 in 10 students didn't purchase a textbook because it was too expensive.  Through OER the cost of student materials can be drastically reduced.  OER also give instructors the ability to customize the materials, creating the "perfect" textbook instead of being bound to traditional print resources. 

For more information, tutorials, and links to different types of OER collections, visit UWF's innovative guide on Open Education Resources

General OER Collections

  • OER Commons (oercommons.org) Curating best in class learning materials from around the world since 2007.  The OER Commons is a single search source that pulls from multiple OER collections, including MERLOT and Connexions.  It is a great first step in an OER search, but often more results can be found by searching the specific collection.  
    • Users can create collections of existing content and create their own content pages to share.
    • The OER Commons is a supported by ISKME (the Institute for the Study of Knowledge Management in Education).
       
  • OpenStax CNX (formerly Connexions) (cnx.org) includes lectures, assignments, and written educational materials.  Content can be created in the Connexions interface and housed within the Connections servers.  Users can create collections of existing content and create their own content pages to share. 
  • MERLOT (merlot.org) is a free and open peer reviewed collection of online teaching and learning materials and faculty-developed services contributed and used by an international education community. MERLOT was opened in 1997 and is supported by the California State University System.  
    • MERLOT does not house content, but is a collection of links to other content.  The materials can be ranked and many are peer-reviewed.  There are discipline specific Communities that curate and review the content. 
    • You can create and share personal collections of content links.
       
  • OpenWashington - (http://www.openwa.org)  is a site designed to help you understand the OER movement and find OER.  They have links for finding textbooks, content, images and video, as well as stories from faculty who have adopted OER in their classrooms.  
     
  • Saylor.org is a non-profit organization sponsored by the Saylor Foundation, they are focused on bringing "freely available education to all."  Founded in 1999 by Michael Saylor, they have created online courses curated from open content found on the Web.  The courses are marketed toward students who just want to learn, and are working on some methods for offering credentials. For faculty, Saylor is a great site to start your search for OER by subject.  
  • Orange Grove (http://florida.theorangegrove.org/og/access/home.do) is a online library of openly available instructional resources for Florida's educators. 
    • The Orange Grove does not house content, but is a collection of links to other content.
    • Only Florida educators are allowed to have registered accounts, but anyone can search for and use content linked in the Grove.  Some resources are only available to registered users. 
    • This site is predominantly focused on K-12 content but there are links to content useful for introductory courses. 
       
  • Europeana – is a gateway to European cultural assets, through this one site you can search for artworks, cultural items, archival collections from participating institutions all around Europe.  This site is a gateway, and once you have selected the items you want you will be redirected to the website of the institution that owns the item, and often these sites will not have English translations.  To find an item with the Creative Commons licensing you prefer - 
  1. Once you type in your initial search on the main page, you will have a list of filters on the left hand side of the page
  2. Use the "Can I use it?" and "By Copyright" filters to narrow down your results
  • Canadiana - Canadiana.org is a coalition of members dedicated to providing broad access to Canada's documentary heritage. Through our membership alliance, Canadian libraries share tools and capacity, partner on open-source projects, and spearhead digital preservation in Canada.

This is not a complete list, and this list will be periodically updated. 

Open Access Journals

What is an Open Access (OA) Journal?
Open access (OA) journals are scholarly journals that are available online to the reader "without financial, legal, or technical barriers other than those inseparable from gaining access to the internet itself."

Open Access Journal Collections & Vendors

The following vendors and collections contain OA articles for the sciences, including health and biological science.

Open Textbooks

The Open Textbook movement focues on the creation of books that are built specifically for use as free or low-cost option for education. Different repositories have different focuses and collections so you should check multiple places. For a more comprehensive list, visit UWF's Open Textbook Collections OER Guide.

  • Open Textbook Library (https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/) – OTL, with over 350 books, is a clearinghouse of links to books in various locations, including OpenStax, Saylor and others. Books in the OTL have been peer reviewed for quality, and the Open Textbook Library has multiple criteria for inclusion in the Library.
  • OpenStax (https://openstax.org/) – These books were developed following traditional textbook publishing methods, including peer review, editorial support, and creation of ancillary content. Books are available in multiple formats (PDF, print on demand, on the Web) and are licensed to be revised and remixed by faculty who want create a custom solution for a course.
  • The National Academies Press (http://www.nap.edu) – Unlike some of the open textbook initiatives these books are publicly available but not openly licensed.  You can link to the content, and even link directly to specific pages.  However, you cannot remix and redistribute the content.
  • GALILEO Open Learning Content (https://oer.galileo.esg.edu) -- GALILEO Open Learning Materials brings together open educational resources throughout the University System of Georgria, including open textbooks and ancillary material. Each document is classified by its Creative Commons license. You are allowed to resuse, redistribute, revis, remix, and retain these documents with particular restrictions. 

Open Courseware for HCA

The OpenCourseWare movement is university driven, and is focused on making the educational course materials that have been created by faculty available outside of the institution.  The materials available vary by course, professor and even semester posed.  Materials can include syllabi,  written lectures, assignments, readings, videotaped lectures, and audio lectures.

The following OCWs have areas with a health focus, such as global health, medical, nursing, and public health.  Browse by subject, course, or collection to identify materials specific to HCA.

License

All original content on this page is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. All linked-to content adheres to its respective license.

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